Current ELO Research Projects

Improve Live Lecture Capture

Development of a Pilot Grant Program to Improve Live Lecture Capture

My research details the results of a pilot grant program developed and implemented at a large Midwestern university. The program was oriented toward improving the quality of online courses taught using lecture capture technologies. The instructor was selected for the pilot of the lecture capture grant due to their exemplary use of lecture capture best practices and student engagement strategies for online learning. The pilot was a graduate-level course in industrial engineering, where online students are able to either join live using an online platform (synchronously) or, alternately, they can watch the recorded lecture video at their convenience (asynchronously). As a part of this project, the instructor met periodically with the instructional support specialist months in advance prior to the fall semester to review learning objectives and outcomes, to prepare course materials, and for guidance using lecture capture best practices. During the fall semester, the instructor and instructional support specialist were able to review the lecture recordings for additional feedback, and instructor reflection while making improvements on the grant and instructor pedagogy throughout the 15-week course.

 The evaluation examined the effectiveness of communication between instructor and student, as well as student to student in a setting that included both in-classroom and online. Students also completed pre- and post-surveys, which were used to assess user familiarity with the learning management system, in addition to identifying the student experience of the course, as well as providing feedback on a number of important issues inherent in the use of lecture capture for a combination of synchronous and asynchronous learners.

Alicia Jenner

A MOOC for U

A MOOC for U: The design of a MOOC based on Universal Design for Learning

In the past few years, Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC) have played a critical role in the realm of online education by extending the ‘anytime-anywhere’ and ‘lifelong learner’ paradigms to another level. MOOCs have not only gained popularity amongst leaners but educators as well (Brown, Chung, & Ho, 2016). MOOCs are leading the way in technically enhanced learning (TEL) in higher education at no or minimal cost to the learner (Yousef, Chatti, Schroeder, & Harald Jakobs, 2014). As MOOCs have grown as an educational alternative serving millions of learners worldwide, it is of utmost importance to channel resources for designing a MOOC that caters to varied learners and learning styles. To accomplish this demand, it is critical to incorporate the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) into the design process.

“Iowa Presidential Caucuses” was the university’s first foray into the world of MOOCs. This paper focuses on how the design decisions, particularly those related to the course layout, structure and content/multi-media creation, were informed by the three principles of UDL in order to minimize barriers and maximize learning (Rose & Meyer, 2002). These include the principles of multiple means of representation, action and expression, and engagement. This was facilitated in the MOOC by means of a consistent navigation throughout the course; providing different means of accessing the course materials (videos, readings, transcripts); accessible course pages and content (utilizing color contrast and alternate texts, screen-reader readable content pages, and closed captions) and a need based learner participation and interaction. This paper also describes the design and development phases, based on the Backward Design framework, wherein, the desired learning outcomes were identified followed by the course material, activities and assessments (Wiggins, 2005). The best practices described in this paper can be universally applied to all online courses to create a learning environment conducive for diverse learners.

Ritushree Chatterjee
Darshana Juvale
Nadia Jaramillo-Cherrez

The History of ELO

The History of ELO

The proposed study will define and examine the major milestones in the development of the current ELO at Iowa State University.

For the past decade, colleges and universities around the country have been developing online course experiences for both undergraduate and graduate students.  These programs have met with mixed success, with some of the programs flourishing while others have failed to provide high quality educational experiences for students.  Given this situation, tracing and sharing the history of a successful distance education support unit at a large public university will provide useful data.

Research questions will include:

  1. What are the major milestones in the development of this program?
  2. Who were the key leaders?
  3. What were the major obstacles?
  4. What are the significant successes?
  5. What is next for the program?

Data will be collected through interviews and focus group sessions with faculty and staff who have been involved in ELO’s development.  Research will begin with a focus group of faculty and staff who have been involved with ELO over time. This group will create a time line with major milestones in the development of the program and identify others who should be interviewed.

Ann Thompson
Rema Nilakanta
Darshana Juvale

Blended Learning Research Project

Blended Learning Research Project

This study intends to explore the definition of blended learning from the perspective of course instructors and instructional designers; understand the difference of their definitions between two groups and redefine the scope of blended learning; inform future practices of blended course design and development at ELO; and provide recommendations for the collaboration between course instructors and instructional designers in the context of higher education.

Jiaqi Yu
Nadia Jaramillo-Cherrez
Darshana Juvale
Ritushree Chatterjee